Interactive Journal of Medical Research

A new general medical journal for the 21st century, focusing on innovation in health and medical research

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


Impact Factor 2023

i-JMR is a general medical journal with a focus on innovation in health, health care, and medicine - through new medical techniques and innovative ideas and/or research, including—but not limited to—technology, clinical informatics, sociotechnical and organizational health care innovations, or groundbreaking research.

i-JMR is indexed in PubMed and archived in PubMed Central, DOAJ, and Clarivate's Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

Recent Articles

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Digital Health, Telehealth and e-Innovation in Clinical Settings

Headaches are common and often lead patients to seek advice from a pharmacist and consequently self-medicate for relief. Computerized pharmacy decision support systems (PDSSs) may be a valuable resource for health care professionals, particularly for community pharmacists when counseling patients with headache, to guide treatment with over-the-counter medications and recognize patients who require urgent or specialist care.

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Respiratory Medicine

Continuous monitoring of vital signs has the potential to assist in the recognition of deterioration of patients admitted to the general ward. However, methods to efficiently process and use continuously measured vital sign data remain unclear.

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Viewpoints

The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the use of remote patient monitoring in clinical practice or research for safety and emergency reasons, justifying the need for innovative digital health solutions to monitor key parameters or symptoms related to COVID-19 or Long COVID. The use of voice-based technologies, and in particular vocal biomarkers, is a promising approach, voice being a rich, easy-to-collect medium with numerous potential applications for health care, from diagnosis to monitoring. In this viewpoint, we provide an overview of the potential benefits and limitations of using voice to monitor COVID-19, Long COVID, and related symptoms. We then describe an optimal pipeline to bring a vocal biomarker candidate from research to clinical practice and discuss recommendations to achieve such a clinical implementation successfully.

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Reviews

Inpatient portals are online platforms that allow patients to access their personal health information and monitor their health while in the acute care setting. Despite their potential to improve quality of care and empower patients and families to participate in their treatment, adoption remains low. Outpatient portal studies have shown that physician endorsement can drive patients' adoption of these systems. Insights on physicians’ perspectives on use of these platforms can help improve patient and physician satisfaction and inpatient portal uptake.

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Reviews

Despite numerous empirical studies and systematic reviews conducted on the effectiveness of interventions improving psychological well-being, there is no holistic overview of published systematic reviews in this field.

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Reviews

Enhancing the educational experience provided by ward rounds requires an understanding of current perceptions of the educational value of rounds.

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Viewpoints

This viewpoint presents a 3-phase conceptual model of the process of user engagement with eHealth apps. We also describe how knowledge gleaned from psychosocial, behavioral, and cognitive science can be incorporated into this model to enhance user engagement with an eHealth app in each phase of the engagement process.

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Articles

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia have participated in Western research for decades. When done well, research has resulted in significant benefits and positive impacts on society. However, the primary benefactor of this research has and continues to be researchers, with limited or no research knowledge mobilized for uptake and beneficial use by end users, such as individuals and communities. In 2021, the Torres Strait Islanders Research to Policy and Practice Hub (the Hub) at James Cook University designed and implemented several strategies, including a games-based interactive workshop with representatives from nongovernment organizations (NGOs). Feedback suggests the workshop and associated activities were a success.

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Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) face significant challenges in the treatment process, which can have a negative impact on disease management. Proper management of the disease can reduce symptoms and complications, improve glycemic indices, and reduce mortality and readmission.

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Reviews

Multifaceted school-based interventions involving many stakeholders show promise toward the reduction of sedentary behavior (SB) and improved musculoskeletal conditions in schoolchildren. In resource-limited contexts, where schools face multiple, complex demands, broad school-based interventions may not be possible. In these settings, less complex, resource-efficient interventions are more likely to be adopted and implemented. Interventions that are limited to classrooms and that do not require broader stakeholder participation may be more appropriate to lower-resource settings.

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Health Services Research

Although a critical safety measure, preliminary studies have suggested that the use of a face mask may pose a problem for some users with disabilities. To date, little is known about how the wearing of a traditional face mask may pose a barrier to individuals with visual impairments who draw on auditory cues and echolocation techniques during independent travel.

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Viewpoints

A scientific paradigm consists of a set of shared rules, beliefs, values, methods, and instruments for addressing scientific problems. Currently, health care embraces the paradigm of evidence-based health care (EBH). This paradigm prompts health care institutions to base decisions on the best available evidence, which is commonly generated in large-scale randomized controlled trials. We illustrate the application of EBH via the evaluation of drugs. We show how EBH is challenged when it is applied to the evaluation of digital therapeutics, which refers to technology and data to prevent, manage, or treat a medical disorder or disease. We conclude that amid the growing application of digital therapeutics, the paradigm of EBH is challenged in four domains: population, intervention, comparison, outcome. In the second part of this viewpoint, we argue for a paradigm shift in health care so we can optimally evaluate and implement digital therapeutics, and we sketch out the contours of this novel paradigm. We address the need for considering design in health care and evaluation processes, studying user values so that health care can move from a focus on health to well-being, focusing on individual experiences rather than the average, addressing the need for evaluation in authentic use contexts, and stressing the need for continuous evaluation of the dynamic relations between users, context, and digital therapeutics. We conclude that the transition from EBH toward evidence-based well-being would improve the successful implementation of digital technologies in health care.

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